Fox’s tiny living future?

We should all be concerned about the future because we will have to spend the rest of our lives there.
~Charles F. Kettering

I’ve been reading a lot of stuff written by people who live in RVs. One thing that caught my attention was the idea of parking someplace, working for a while while saving a bunch, and then wandering about until the money ran out and it was time to work again. Sounds like my kinda life, and one I could easily live considering my very minimal financial needs. Doubly so if I had the RV paid off.

Of course, my biggest concern is the fact that such a life makes saving for retirement improbable. Temporary jobs don’t often pay well, nor do they come with the benefits that long-term jobs have…such as retirement plans.

So the question is…do I live like I am, saving my ass off for retirement and in hopes that I could save enough to invest enough to enable me to work very little? Or do I live like I want to live, and put very little away for the future? If I had a decent job, I’d go with the former. But without that job, the question’s not so easy.

Right now, my answer is to go for it, and live like I want to. Life is short, and I don’t want to be sixty-five and full of regret. I can always change my mind and settle down if I want. And this won’t be happening for several years…in order to pull this off, I have to be debt-free, and own an RV. Which means I have some serious saving to do, even if I decide to deal with the debt, buy the RV early, and live in it while making payments.

The RV will be used, of course. Some of the ones I was looking at cost $100,000 new. After taxes…yeah. If I search enough, maybe I can find a relatively new one in the hands of someone with buyer’s remorse.

The other issue is my (now) three cats. That’s a lot of cats to live in one RV. But I’ve got a few years to figure that out, too. Luckily, two of them are already accustomed to living in relatively small spaces, although not as small as an RV.

But there’s a lot that could happen between now and then. I can make plans, and try to see them out, but how things will pan out ultimately is anyone’s guess. If you would like to help out financially, though, you can do so via Paypal. For the few, the proud, the ones who have already donated, you are all the most fucking amazing people on the entire planet, even if I don’t notice your donation for months until one glorious day and thus I forgot to thank you. D: You guys rock something AWESOME.

That’s right, donate and you, too, could feel the gratification of having me tell you how awesome you are in public.

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7 Responses to “Fox’s tiny living future?”

  1. If you can pull it off, go for it! I do have health insurance at my job, but at this point I have very little use for it because I’ve gotten myself into very good health. If that’s a concern also make sure to learn as much as you can to heal yourself.

    • Dargon Says:

      Being healthy is all well and good until an emergency crops up out of nowhere and a four hour trip to the hospital nets you a $7000 bill, as was the case for uninsured and didn’t need it me.

  2. Martin Says:

    I don’t know how old you are or what your work skills are so this comment is sort of off the wall. with respect to your dilemma.

    I’m an old guy (74) and I worked pretty hard and consistently all my life – and retired out of my own consulting business about ten years ago.

    During my working years, I did what many people do; got married, then divorced, married again, divorced again and, yes, remarried. I saved some $$, invested some $$, bought (and sold) a home or three and, when I retired, I had what seemed to be a pretty good stash, which, with social security, I thought would see me through quite a few years. But time and fortune have a way of turning things around.

    First of all, I invested a lot of the stash in “sure things” like one or two dot-com start-ups. So those $$ disappeared. And around the same time I began visiting Hawaii and a few other desirable places – nice, but more $$ down the drain.

    So I hunkered down and began what I thought was a more frugal lifestyle – and a few more investments – of the “safe” type this time.

    Then it was 2007/08 and another huge chunk of the “stash” evaporated – most of it, in fact.

    Anyhow, the upshot of all this is now my wife and I live in a rental, she has a pretty good but only 2/3rds time job and I’m living on just my SS income and looking for a job – fat chance of getting one at my age in this job climate.

    The upside is that I’m healthy, hearty and still have (most of) my sense of humor.

    Why did I tell you all this? Its just to say, you never really know what’s coming around the corner – you can only guess. So I’d advise you to examine your heart and soul, determine what it is you really want to do, regardless of the consequences or $$ or anything else, and then set about to do it. Which is not to say ‘don’t be concerned about the future’, but don’t let a supposed future dampen your enthusiasm for anything you really want to do.

    • I watched one of my old bosses slowly lose most of his retirement investment during 2008. It made me leery of the stock market, that’s for sure.

      And whatever I decide to do, I’ll definitely have one eye on the future. Of course, balancing the future with the present is the tricky part. I’m hoping I’ll find a way to manage it somehow.

  3. Have you considered using a motorcycle + trailer instead of an RV? It’s a lot smaller, obviously, and without the amenities an RV can contain, but the fuel efficiency is better, and motorcycles are really fun to drive. You can easily carry a tent (don’t even need a trailer for that), and rain gear + warm clothes pretty much covers your weatherizing needs.

    • This is something I intend on living in permanently. I’ve lived in a tent for a month and a half, and that’s not something I want to do for years on end. It’d also mean giving up my cats, which is not gonna happen. :P

      And motorcycles scare the ever-living fuck out of me, to tell you the truth.

      • Motorcycles should scare the ever-living fuck out of anyone who rides them. If you ever stop being at least somewhat afraid of them, then that’s when you need to stop riding.
        But yeah, doing the cat-on-a-motorcycle thing is okay for short trips to the vet and such, if you only have one, but beyond that it’s a bad call. Even beyond the difficulties, and the potential killing of a cat if you wipe (even if you yourself are fine), it’s just plain going to stress them out to have that much wind and noise and such for a long period of time.
        And I don’t think I’d want to not have solid walls to fall back on. Tents are great, but tents in a hailstorm are kinda shit. Trust me.

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