Financially simple, remarkably strange

What was I doing here? What was the meaning of this trip? Was I just roaming around in a drug frenzy of some kind? Or had I really come out here to Las Vegas to work on a story? Who are these people, these faces? Where do they come from? They look like caricatures of used car dealers from Dallas, and sweet Jesus, there were a hell of a lot of them at 4:30 on a Sunday morning, still humping the American dream, that vision of the big winner somehow emerging from the last minute pre-dawn chaos of a stale Vegas casino.
~Raoul Duke, “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”

I was applying for a mortgage loan at my credit union. The counselor printed out my credit report, and upon looking at it, remarked that I had just enough lines of credit to qualify, and no more.

“You must lead a very simple life,” he said.

I don’t know what I said in response. I should’ve asked why everyone else chooses to lead such complicated lives. Is it really that hard to know how to decline the allure of credit, or to say “I’ve spent enough,” or to realize that living at or above your means isn’t sustainable? I would’ve thought the latter, at least, is self-evident.

I know it’s easy to just slide into bad spending habits, or to have unforeseen circumstances ruin your plans. But how is it that financial simplicity is remarkable? How is it that most people choose to complicate themselves in one of the most excruciating ways?

I have no answer for this. Perhaps I should stop drinking while watching Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. It does things to my head.

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